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Tuesday, November 10, 2020 | History

2 edition of life history and taxonomic study of the Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis found in the catalog.

life history and taxonomic study of the Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis

John Sylvester Hall

life history and taxonomic study of the Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis

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Published by Reading Public Museum and Art Gallery in Reading, Pa .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Myotis sodalis.

  • Edition Notes

    Based upon a dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Zoology in the Graduate College of the University of Illinois.

    StatementJohn S. Hall.
    SeriesScientific publications -- no. 12.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination68 p.
    Number of Pages68
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16121232M
    LC Control Number65086780


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life history and taxonomic study of the Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis by John Sylvester Hall Download PDF EPUB FB2

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A life history and taxonomic study of the Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis (Scientific publications)Author: John Sylvester Hall. A Life History and Taxonomic Study of the Indiana Bat, Myotis Sodalis Paperback – January 1, by J. Hall (Author), Maps Photos (Illustrator) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editionsAuthor: J.

Hall. A life history and taxonomic study of the Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis (Book, ) [] Get this from a library. A life history and taxonomic study of the Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis.

Genus: Myotis Species Myotis sodalis Common name Indiana bat Lifespan, ageing, and relevant traits Maximum longevity 20 years (wild) Source ref.

Sample size Medium Data quality Acceptable Observations No observations are presently available Life history traits (averages) Female sexual maturity Male sexual maturity. A life history and taxonomic study of the Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis.

Reading Publication Museum Art Gallery, Science Publication 68 pp. Hamilton, W. J., Jr., and J. Whitaker, Jr.

Mammals of the eastern United States. Disclaimer: ITIS taxonomy is based on the latest scientific consensus available, and is provided as a general reference source for interested parties. However, it is not a legal authority for statutory or regulatory purposes. While every effort has been made to provide the most reliable and up-to-date information available, ultimate legal requirements with respect to species are.

El ratpenat d'Indiana (Myotis sodalis) és una life history and taxonomic study of the Indiana bat de mamífer pertanyent a la família dels vespertiliònids. Es troba a Nord-amèrica: des de l'est d'Oklahoma i Iowa fins a Michigan, Nova York, Nova Anglaterra, el nord de Nova Jersey, el nord d'Alabama i ment, també n'hi havia una població al nord-oest de Florida.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) was listed as an endangered species by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) on Ma (32 FR ) and is currently protected under the Endangered Species Act of.

The southeastern bat: another cave-roosting species in peril. Bats 10 (2) Hall, J.S. A life history and taxonomic study of the Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis. Reading Publication Museum Art Gallery, Science Publication 12 12, 68 pages.

Hall, J.S. Status of the endangered Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis, in Pennsylvania. Notes. A life history and Myotis sodalis book study of the Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis. Reading Publ. Mus. Art Gallery Sci. Publ. Humphrey, S. Status, winter habitat and management of the endangered Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park: The Indiana bat was first recorded at park headquarters in In2, individuals were counted in Blowhole Cave in Whiteoak Sink. Inapproximat bats were observed; in6, were present; in10, bats were counted; in5, bats were counted; and in3, bats were present in the.

The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) is a medium-sized mouse-eared bat native to North lives primarily in Southern and Midwestern U.S. states and is listed as an endangered species. The Indiana bat is gray, black, or chestnut in color and is – in long and weighs – g. Discover Life's page about the biology, natural history, ecology, identification and distribution of Myotis sodalis - Indiana myotis -- Discover Life.

very poor scanned image of Life History and Taxonomic Study of the Indiana Bat, Myotis sodalis, by John S. Hall (Reading, Pennsylvania, Reading Public Museum and Art Gallery Scientific Publication Num59 pages) [Scanned image was supplied by Barbara.

"A Life History and Taxonomic Study of the Indiana Bat, Myotis sodalis." Read ing Public Museum and Art Gallery, Scientific Publications No. 12, pp.Reading, Pa. Hassell, M. Intra-cave activity of four species of bats hibernating in Kentucky. Hall, J.S. A life history and taxonomic study of the Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis.

Reading Public Museum and Art Gallery. Reading, Pennsylvania. Gallery Publication Hobson, C. and J. Holland. Post-hibernation movement and foraging habitat of a. We compared the roosting behavior of federally endangered Indiana bats (Myotis sodalis) in a fragmented site, located on the leading edge of a developing urban area (Indianapolis, IN), with a.

Hall JS () A life history and taxonomic study of the Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis. Reading Public Museum Publ –68 Reading Public Museum Publ –68 Google Scholar. for the Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) at the Ohio Department of Transportation and the Montgomery County Transportation Improvement District Byers Road project (PID ) Hall, J.S.

A life history and taxonomic study of the Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis. Reading Public Museum and Art Gallery, Scientific Publications The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) is a small (7–10 g), insectivorous species that lives only in the eastern United States (Thomson ).The species was declared endangered in the United States inunder the Endangered Species Preservation Act ofbecause of large decreases in population size and an apparent lack of critical habitat in winter (Clawson.

The Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis, is a small bat with a weight that ranges from approximately 5 to 11 grams. The forearm ranges from approximately 36 to mm, the hind foot from approximately 8 to 10mm, the tail length from approximately 27 to 44mm, and the ear height from approximately 12 to 15mm.

examining the suitability of the little brown bat (myotis lucifugus) as a surrogate for the endangered indiana bat (m. sodalis). a thesis submitted to the graduate school in partial fulfullment of the requirements for a master of science degree by: scott m.

bergeson department of biology ball state university muncie, indiana advisor: dr. Defiance Counties, Ohio, and its effects on the Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) in accordance with section 7 of the Endangered Species Act (Act) ofas amended (16 U.S.C.

et seq.). Onthe Service received FHWA’s request for formal consultation along with the. White-nose Syndrome (WNS) is a mycosis caused by a cutaneous infection with the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd).

It produces hibernation mortality rates of 75–98% in 4 bats: Myotis lucifugus, M. septentrionalis, M.

sodalis, and Perimyotis subflavus. These high mortality rates were observed during the first several years after the arrival of P. Myotis sodalis (Indiana bat) was most restricted in areas occupied, hibernating in thermally stable yet cold areas (\({\bar X} \) = ± °C); 99% associated with cement block walls and.

Myotis sodalis, also known as the Indiana bat, is found only in North America. Their range spans from Iowa, Missouri, and northern Arkansas east to western Virginia and North Carolina, and north into New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts.

Species profile about species listing status, federal register publications, recovery, critical habitat, conservation planning, petitions, and life history U.S.

Fish & Wildlife Service ECOS Environmental Conservation Online System. Jul 5, - She grew up small & she flew alright, with those Indiana Bats in the Indiana night. See more ideas about Indiana, Bat, Endangered pins. Species-wide effects are difficult to study and few, if any, studies examine effects of wind energy generation on any species across its entire range.

One species that may be affected by wind energy generation is the endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis), which is found in the eastern and midwestern United States.

In addition to mortality. The little brown bat or little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) is a species of mouse-eared microbat found in North has a small body size and glossy brown fur. It is similar in appearance to several other mouse-eared bats, including the Indiana bat, northern long-eared bat, and Arizona myotis, to which it is closely e its name, the little brown bat is.

This disease causes mortality in at least 6 species of bats, including the endangered Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis), with mortality rates in some hibernacula averaging 95%. Since the onset of this disease in winterapproximately 6 million bats are estimated to have been killed. A life history and taxonomic study of the Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis.

Reading Public Museum and Art Gallery. Scientific Publication Number Reading, Pennsylvania. 68 pp. Jr.: Department of Life Sciences, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, Indiana USA James B. Cope (1): Department of Biology, Earlham College, Richmond.

Indiana Bat (Myotis Sodalis) Facts. Indiana Bats are one of Georgia's 16 bat species and can be found throughout Atlanta, GA. The Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis) is one of Georgia's cave bats and can be found throughout the Eastern United States.

This cave bat can bee seen hibernating in large colonies upwards of 20, - 50, bats. Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis) draft recov-ery plan: First revision. US Fish and Wildlife Service, Fort Snelling, MN. A life history and taxonomic study of the Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis. Study area and sample data.

We included the entire eastern United States in our models (Fig. 1).Maternity records of Indiana bats from to were obtained from the draft recovery plan (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service ) and additional records were obtained from the U.S.

Fish and Wildlife gh the records date back to75% of the records. Blind test for ability to discriminate vocal signatures of the little brown bat Myotis lucifugus and the Indiana bat Myotis sodalis.

Bat Research News, 40,   Hall, J. A life history and taxonomic study of the Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis. Reading Public Mus. and Art Gallery, Scientific Publ. 68 pp. Overwinter weight loss of Indiana bats (Myotis sodalis) from hibernacula subject to human visitation.

American Midland Naturalist Rice, D. Life history and. Data strongly suggested the occurrence of Indiana bat maternity colonies at two study sites not investigated during field work.

Indiana bats were captured in 2 counties in Illinois from which they had not been reported previously. A total of 24 Myotia sodalis were banded during the second year of field work. However, after 10 years in place, it appears that Indiana bats are acclimated to boxes, as 6 of them were being used rather regularly by Indiana myotis.

Bat. 1. Physical insulation was examined in five North American bats: Lasiurus us cinereus, Myotis lucifugus, Myotis keenii, and Eptesicus fuscus. Lasiurines were more insulated than the other three species, which appears to be related to the habits of these species; lasiurines are solitary, occupying tree roosts, whereas Myotis and.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Review of the forest habitat relationships of the Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis). Newton Square, PA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station, [].Feeding Ecology Of The Indiana Bat, Myotis Sodalis, And Resource Partitioning With Myotis Keenii And Myotis Lucifugus.

M.S. Thesis, Univ. Tennessee, Knoxville. () 3/D Environmental Services, Inc. A Model Of Summer Habitat Use By The Federally Endangered Indiana Bat (Myotis Sodalis) In Indiana: Compilation Of Data From Field.Illinois counties to determine the summer distribution of the federally endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis).

A total of Indiana bats was captured at 35 sites in 21 counties in the southern three-fourths of Illinois. Adult male Indiana bats were also found to be using two caves and one mine during the summer. Because one cave was located.